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rabbittwalter:

themousebot:

rabbittwalter:

themousebot:

aaayyy thats good too!

yours were gr8 trust me

i’m just a sucker for horrible puns

aaahhh thats ok, puns are the best

psshhh i actually ended up using one of yours with a mild alternation

it’s gonna be #OTP: Baby Bennoots;

Source: rabbittwalter
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rabbittwalter:

rabbittwalter:

kerowynn:

It is a ghost spine!! It is a spooky spooky world

WHAT IS THIS FROM OH MY GOD DAVID

MIRANDA NO DAT’S BAD

Source: kerowynn
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lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

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FAVOURITE THING

(via georgeisabass)

Source: mothernaturenetwork
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its-anselelgort:

"Hey, guys! It’s Ansel and I’m on the set of Insurgent."

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phosphorescentt:

gillianandersons:

do you ever realize that there was a moment when your mom or dad put you down as a baby and never picked you up again

I told my mom about this and she walked over and picked me up I am a 22 year old adult woman

(via georgeisabass)

Source: mulders
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iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so godamn cool

(via bunnyisthequeen)

Source: iguanamouth
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playstation2chainz:

"are you a good kisser"

what kind of question is that like how am i supposed to know???? i can’t kiss myself

(via georgeisabass)

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deonte-s:

purplekecleon:

purplekecleon:

purplekecleon:

So it turns out that even if I say no, if a company doesn’t like my answer, they’ll do it anyway. A big “fuck you” to poprageous, who I contacted last year, received a reply that essentially said “no I won’t pay you,” and then did it anyway 12 months later (I suppose she hoped I would forget about her?).

Before I replied to her first scummy email where she only says that she’d send me a FREE PAIR (oh WOW), I made a blog post

I had recently undergone other companies trying to do the same thing and her email reply to me was just nothing short of incredibly shitty. After seeing my post (which didn’t mention her company or anything) she thought it would be a good idea to send me an email trying to make ME feel bad that I didn’t just ASK for money for using my artwork. That it was on ME to ask about royalties, not about her fucking company to actually fairly pay artists or anything.

"I saw your post - what do u want to get paid? Let’s work out a royalty.  jeeeez all u had to do was ask."

Like seriously?

All I had to do was ask? That’s pretty hilarious, considering she asked, I said no, and she went ahead with it anyway.

Regardless, this is shit. Companies shouldn’t act like this. People using creator’s works just because they exist and feel like they should be able to is just absolutely bullshit.

The most appalling thing about this is seriously the fact that I said no and she did it anyway. I said no and she did it anyway.

This is how little most companies respect and regard artists. Thanks a lot, Cher Park.

Feel free to let her know that it’s not acceptable to pull this bullshit with her company email, cher@poprageous.com - please don’t be rude or anything, but this is definitely not okay and she needs to not do this to other artists in the future.

Oh yes, let me not forgot to mention: she has no trace of credit on the image, this time. She posted an instagram earlier a year ago with credit to my name, but it seems she’d rather remove it so that I not find out, I guess.

Good job, Cher Park.

Oh good! There are leggings, too!

hey everybody! don’t buy this shit! fuck these guys!

(via bunnyisthequeen)

Source: purplekecleon
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shadowcutie:

First time drawing me in a while!  *Sigh* I really need to get a pizzajohn shirt irl.  [dA]

(via hazels)

Source: shadowcutie
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applesighs:

god why.png

drew this for the prompt “the spine dancing and singing to terrible country songs to cheer rabbit up when shes sad”

work those legs spine WORK IT.

(via rabbittwalter)

Source: applesighs
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tfhumor:

do you ever just

image

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Source: tfhumor
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slothilda:

Some experts claim that social media “likes” provide us with an improper sense of self-worth … but I still like em.

(via bunnyisthequeen)

Source: slothilda
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wendyybirdd:

sometimes i get too deep thinking about spg lyrics and i have to stop and remind myself that they wrote a song about riding a quesadilla

(via rabbittwalter)

Source: wendyybirdd